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Columbus Injured Worker Legal Blog

Periodic reviews of an SSD beneficiary's medical condition

Those from Franklin County who receive SSD benefits will have their benefits reviewed at various points. The notice of the first review is given by the Social Security Administration at the time of awarding the benefits and subsequent reviews are conducted based in the severity of the disabling condition and the likelihood of improvement.

In addition to the list of eligible medical conditions, the SSA's Red Book contains the guidelines based on which the administration conducts periodic reviews in order to determine whether the SSD benefits for an individual are to be continued, revised or stopped. Broadly, the reviews can be classified into three categories that are based on the possibility of improvement: "Improvement Expected" cases are reviewed 18 months after the award of SSD benefits; "Improvement Possible" cases are reviewed every 3 years after; "Improvement Not Expected" cases are reviewed every 5 to 7 years after.

What can your employer do to make your job safer?

Ohio workers have the right to a workplace that is free from preventable hazards and unnecessary risks. Employers are responsible for doing everything they can to keep workers safe. No matter what type of job you have or the nature of your work environment, there are probably ways to increase safety and reduce the chance of an accident.

Establishing and maintaining a safe workplace is important, but this takes vigilance and a commitment to the well-being of all employees. As a worker, you will find it helpful to review the potential hazards you may face while on the job, as well as what you can do to protect your rights and interests in the event you suffer an accident in the workplace.

What workers' comp type benefits are available to rail workers?

The railways are an integral part of the transport infrastructure of any state or country. Several thousand miles of railroads traverse Ohio and the rest of the country and provide an important means of transport for both freight and passengers. In order to make sure that such a vast rail network functions smoothly, railroad companies employ a large number of workers for the upkeep of the network. These workers, however, are often exposed to workplace hazards that are unique to the railways.

The Congress passed the Federal Employers Liability Act in 1908 to protect railroad workers. This federal act covers the thousands of railroad workers in Ohio and the rest of the country. According to the FELA, a worker employed by a railroad company is eligible for compensation if he or she is injured while on duty, irrespective of whether such duty was being carried out on the railway tracks or away from it. In the event of a workplace death, the family of the deceased worker is entitled to compensation.

Are there jobs that place you at a higher risk for injury?

Ohio workers have the right to a workplace that is reasonably safe and free from unnecessary risks. However, certain jobs are more dangerous than others simply by nature. If you work in a specific occupation, you may face a higher risk of injury every time you are on the clock. 

No matter how dangerous your job is, you still have certain rights in the event of a workplace accident. It may be helpful for you to learn about the factors that could be placing you in harm's way as well as what to do in the event you need support and help after suffering an injury. You may be eligible for help through a claim filed with your employer's workers' compensation insurance.

How schizophrenia can make it impossible to work

Given how it is often portrayed in the media, people in the greater Columbus area may not fully understand how schizophrenia really works. For example, not everyone who has this condition is honestly going to believe that they are more than one person at the same time.

Still, schizophrenia is in fact a serious mental disorder that can make it very hard for a person to find or maintain employment.

Can I get both workers' compensation and Social Security?

As readers of this Columbus, Ohio blog probably know, our law office represents injured workers who likely need help making financial ends meet. After all, when someone is out of work, perhaps indefinitely, due to a workplace injury, it is important that she receive all the compensation available to her.

In this state, Ohio has a workers' compensation program through which those who get hurt or sickened on the job can get help with medical bills as well as some compensation for lost wages. For those whose condition is long-term, Social Security Disability benefits may be available through the federal government.

Earning workers' comp and returning to work could look like this

It can be uncharted territory for those who have suffering a work injury looking towards the future. Work injuries cannot only be a nuisance, they can step in the way of one's ability to earn a living wage for themselves and their family. That's what workers' comp is for, employers are required to be insured in this way to cover instance of employee injury. However, before a worker agrees to workers' comp, it's good to think about what the future may hold with that decision path.

Depending on a worker's situation, returning to work could resembled a few different scenarios. Sometimes, a worker is able to heal after a certain amount of time and return to the work they were originally performing. Some workers, however, return to work at a lesser capacity, and thus a lesser wage. In these situations, the worker may continue to receive wage loss benefits, although the benefits will most likely be for a lesser amount.

Did the government shut down affect Social Security disability?

There has been much talk about the wait that many experience when seeking Social Security disability benefits. However, with a government shut down in recent week's past, some may be wondering how or if this affect the Social Security disability claims process. However, those wanting to seek benefits shouldn't be discouraged from applying. This is because the government shut-down didn't affect this facet of government operations.

The Social Security Administration, or SSA, oversees so many crucial aspects that impact millions of lives, and thus, funding for their operations is scheduled out past immediate needs. At the time of the shutdown, the SSA was funded through September 2019. This means that operations were not shut down during the partial government shutdown. So no need to worry about applications piling up at the door, going unanswered.

Can technology make it safer to work on construction sites?

For the men and women who work at a construction site, each workday represents the possibility of an injury. Construction work is often hazardous, and workers frequently face an increased chance of experiencing an injury from an accident or other type of incident. It is critical for Ohio employers in this field to work diligently to protect the well-being of their employees as much as possible. 

Construction safety is important, and there are many ways to improve safety and reduce the chance of an accident. In fact, the implementation of different types of technology may be the key to reducing injuries, improving safety for all construction workers and making it easier to recognize risks.

Qualifying for SSD/SSI benefits could be easier than you think

As we come into the new year, many make resolutions in terms of goals they have for themselves for the year. A year is a significant period of time in which, if a person sets their mind to it, can change the entire scope of a person's life. Such could easily be true if a person seeks out and qualifies for SSD/SSI benefits. What does this entail and how could it change a person's life for the better in 2019?

Most often, people want to know if they will qualify before setting off on the quest to obtain SSD/SSI benefits. It may not be clear initially if a person will qualify. Only after gathering the necessary information such as medical records, employment history and other relevant records and information, can one begin to answer that question to its fullest extent.

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Philip J. Fulton Law OfficeRepresenting Victims Of Workplace Injuries And Disability

89 East Nationwide Boulevard
Suite 300
Columbus, OH 43215

Toll Free: 866-552-6353
Phone: 614-929-3126
Fax: 614-224-3933
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