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Worker loses fingers to an unguarded machine in Ohio

When you go to work, you expect that the safety protocols are going to be followed. When they aren’t, you could be putting yourself at risk for a workplace accident. On Dec. 18, a report came out about a worker from Ohio who suffered from the amputation of four fingers in June. According to the news, the machine the worker was using was unguarded, and it was used to bend tubes at the Plainesville Grand Rock Co. Inc., an automotive parts manufacturer.

The OSHA area director in Cleveland has said that the failure to provide machine guarding at the facility is unacceptable. One willful violation was cited because the company hadn’t ensured points of operation were guarded on the tube bending machines. This violation means that the company knew the law’s requirements and disregarded it, even though it could result in employee injuries. The proposed penalty is $52,500.

The company has 15 days from the time it receives the citations to comply with the adjustments that are needed. It may also contest the findings in front of the Independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

This horrible accident should have been avoided; machines in factories and manufacturing plants are supposed to be guarded and protected, and when they aren’t, serious injuries can occur. There is no reason that the company wouldn’t know about the laws with respect to safety equipment or pieces. If you’ve been hurt at work, you might want to consider seeking compensation for your injuries. With some legal advice, you may also be able to have the company change its methods, so others won’t be hurt in the future.

Source: WorkersCompensation.com, “Ohio Worker Has Fingers Amputated by Unguarded Machine” No author given, Dec. 18, 2013

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