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Posts tagged "requirements"

What work history is relevant when applying for disability?

Previously in this space, we have touched on the various requirements necessary to qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance or Supplemental Security Income. Both these federal programs, as administered by the states, serve as a safety net of sorts for those people who cannot earn an income because some physical or psychological handicap prevents them from being gainfully employed. As we have said in the past, this means that the person who is applying needs to show that he or she is unable to work due to a disabling condition, and that the condition is terminal, or has lasted or is expected to last longer than one year. But how does the Social Security Agency go about determining which jobs a person needs to show he or she cannot perform?

How are earnings reported with regard to SSI?

Supplemental Security Income, as we have touched on in the past, is a program meant for people who are disabled but have not worked enough - and therefore paid enough into the Social Security system - to be eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance. As these programs are meant as a safety net for disabled individuals, one of the factors in whether one qualifies for benefits, and the size of those benefits, is whether that person earns any income, and how much. Therefore, those attempting to gain or continue receiving SSI benefits must report their earnings to the Social Security Administration.

What's the difference between workers' compensation SSD benefits?

Ohio residents may be aware that people who have been injured, and, due to the severity of their conditions, cannot work, may be eligible to receive certain government benefits. There are a few programs geared to ensuring that those who are too disabled to work have some safety net that will allow them to support themselves in some fashion. Two of these programs are worker's compensation and Social Security Disability (SSD). The question may then arise: what is the difference between these two programs?

Ohio veterans have different SSD benefit eligibility rules

The federal Government Accountability Office (GAO) issued a report recently showing than a number of military veterans receive military retirement benefits, as well as veteran's and social security disability (SSD) payments. The report put the number of so-called "triple dippers" at somewhere around 60,000. While some are concerned about the amount of money being spent in these instances, others point out that the benefits are retirement pay earned through years of service, and the veterans are often disabled due to injuries suffered in the line of duty.

What information do I need to apply for SSD in Ohio?

Being disabled and unable to work is difficult enough for most Ohioans. Then, to receive benefits from the federal Social Security Administration (SSA), you have to fill out an application with all the correct information needed to ensure you meet the requirements for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). This application can be made a few different ways, including in person, over the phone or online. In any event, there is some basic information you will need if you want to create as complete an application as you can.

Annual COLA of Social Security Disability to be under 2 percent

Ohio residents should be aware that every year, the federal government changes the amount of benefits it pays out through the Social Security System to retirees and those who qualify for Social Security Disability. This change, called a "Cost of Living Adjustment" (COLA), is meant to keep the purchasing power of the benefits paid roughly the same year to year. This adjustment began in the mid-1970s due to high inflation rates that were beginning to impoverish many people receiving benefits.

What rights do I have when I apply for SSI?

Residents of Ohio, like residents of any other U.S. state have certain rights to benefits from the federal government, if they meet the requirements set out in federal regulations and statutes. One of those benefits programs is the Supplemental Security Income, also known as SSI. SSI is a program under which the federal government pays an amount out of the general treasury (as opposed to the social security trust fund) to persons who are disabled, blind, and have limited resources. So, what rights do you have when you wish to attempt to qualify for SSI benefits?

What is the difference between SSD and SSI benefits?

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSD) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are two programs that may help struggling Ohio residents. While they have similar-sounding acronyms, and are both meant to help people who can't work, there are some important differences between them.

SSA plans to close more field offices

Sometimes, you need a human touch. While the internet is very useful, and enables many people to quickly find a great variety of information, for many situations, there is no substitute for sitting down with a real person, and going over paperwork, piece by piece. In a recently released planning document, the Social Security Administration (SSA) has indicated that it has plans to move more operations to an internet basis.

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Philip J. Fulton Law OfficeRepresenting Victims Of Workplace Injuries And Disability

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